Culture & Leisure

Museum of Human Anatomy, Petah Tikvah

1963

Petah Tikvah
Sharet 16

The Museum of Human Anatomy was planned and built in the beginning of the 1960’s. It was built near the Yad LeBanim complex as well as the Petah Tikvah Museum – both planned by Leitersdorf and Belsitzman, as well. This proximity to other cultural buildings completes the city’s museum complex. The museum’s structure is unique, both within Petah Tikvah’s urban landscape and within the firm’s body of works. The roofing construction is made out of three pieces of concrete forming one morphological shell that rests on three vertices, anchored to the ground by concrete. The seam of the concrete pieces is highlighted in perpendicular arteries that converge to one point at the center of the roof. This roofing technology was innovative and new at the time, especially in Israel, and throughout the project the firm consulted with senior engineers from the Technion. Furthermore, the firm made a model of the building in 1:5 scale, in order to verify the stability of the concrete shell. To this day, the building serves its original purpose as a museum, hosting exhibits and tours about the human body.